Hungry Runner

Eating Healthy on the Go: How to Make Meals for the Week in Under an Hour

If the thought of sitting down to write out complicated meals that require following intricate recipes and spending hours at a time in the kitchen, all to “prep” your meals for the week makes you want to strangle a head of broccoli, then you’ve come to the right place. Because that is not what this post is about.

This post is about spending just one hour or less of your free time in the kitchen, prepping a few healthy meals for the week ahead. Of course, cutting down on time means cooking in bulk and therefore eating some of the same meals twice in one week, something I’m totally OK with. So if  you’re ok with that too, then awesome! Let me teach you my ways.

Continue reading…

Vegan Coco-Nutty “French” Toast
I really don’t have anything to say about this recipe besides, OH. MY. GOD! Party in my mouth!
One night I was scrolling through Instagram before bed, and briefly caught a glimpse of someone’s photo that mentioned making French Toast but replacing the eggs with coconut oil. Well, I went to sleep dreaming of baked breakfast goods, then gave the idea a shot when I woke up the next morning. I didn’t look up any recipes or second guess it for one second. I just heated some coconut oil in a pan, and the rest is history. Delicious, delicious history.
Any kind of bread will probably taste really, really good with this recipe, but I’m convinced that what really took this over the top was the fact that I used Ezekiel bread. The nutty flavor of the bread mixed with the coconut oil is just out of this world!
Screw traditional French toast. I’m making mine Coconut style from now on.
Ingredients:
1 Slice of Bread (preferably Ezekiel)
1-2 T Coconut Oil Oil (Depending on how saturated you like your “French” toast.)
Directions:
1. Heat the coconut oil in a medium-sized frying pan for about 1 minutes.
2. Place the bread in the pan and use a fork to swirl it around in the oil.
3. Flip the bread over and swirl it around again to coat the other side.
4. Cook each side on medium heat for 2-3 minutes or until the bread turns “toasty.”
Optional: Serve with Oatmeal!

Vegan Coco-Nutty “French” Toast

I really don’t have anything to say about this recipe besides, OH. MY. GOD! Party in my mouth!

One night I was scrolling through Instagram before bed, and briefly caught a glimpse of someone’s photo that mentioned making French Toast but replacing the eggs with coconut oil. Well, I went to sleep dreaming of baked breakfast goods, then gave the idea a shot when I woke up the next morning. I didn’t look up any recipes or second guess it for one second. I just heated some coconut oil in a pan, and the rest is history. Delicious, delicious history.

Any kind of bread will probably taste really, really good with this recipe, but I’m convinced that what really took this over the top was the fact that I used Ezekiel bread. The nutty flavor of the bread mixed with the coconut oil is just out of this world!

Screw traditional French toast. I’m making mine Coconut style from now on.

Ingredients:

1 Slice of Bread (preferably Ezekiel)

1-2 T Coconut Oil Oil (Depending on how saturated you like your “French” toast.)

Directions:

1. Heat the coconut oil in a medium-sized frying pan for about 1 minutes.

2. Place the bread in the pan and use a fork to swirl it around in the oil.

3. Flip the bread over and swirl it around again to coat the other side.

4. Cook each side on medium heat for 2-3 minutes or until the bread turns “toasty.”

Optional: Serve with Oatmeal!

Eating Healthy on a Budget
One time, someone told me that eating healthy was “too expensive.”
Wait. Just kidding. That’s happened a lot more times than one.
One time, I proved all of the naysayers completely and utterly wrong.
Oh wait. Just kidding again. That didn’t happen just one time. Because I prove them all wrong every Sunday when Breanne and I go food shopping and spend only $40-$55 for an entire weeks worth of food, for two people. Individually, that’s about $20-$25 per week on groceries. That’s $80-$100 per month. Even better, that’s just $2-$4 per day for 3 big, healthy, wholesome meals… AND snacks! Lots of snacks!
This is a rough outline of our weekly grocery list. All of this food feeds me and my roommate Breanne for an entire week. Most weeks we have plenty of food to spare and we carry it over to use in our meals for the next week. For example, a 32oz. Bag of almonds lasts us at least two weeks. As does the same size bag of raisins. Which is why our bill varies from week to week.
But we’ve never spent over $55 in one week. We like to throw new things into the mix every now and then too. Gotta keep it tasty and interesting! Like this week, we invested in a huge butternut squash that was only $2 and a big can of pumpkin puree for baking. (We do lots of baking!)
I know a lot of you are probably thinking, “Hm..This really does not seem like a lot of food.”
Buuut.. it actually is, annnnd what this list doesn’t include (because we don’t need to buy these things on a weekly basis) is some of the other staples in our weekly diet like brown rice, whole wheat pasta, peanut butter, and quinoa, plus cooking staples like spices, oils, and flours. We stock up on those kinds of items in bulk when we need them, so they’re more of a monthly or bi-monthly expense.
One time, (and this time I’m seriously talking about one specific incident) someone told me that eating healthy was too expensive and then admitted to spending $15 on lunch at Whole Foods that day. One meal, for almost as much as I spend on food in a whole week!  Uh, yeah.. that is pretty expensive!Let’s delve more into this topic for a moment.
For those of you who don’t know, I live in Manhattan. And since we’re talking about buying food in Manhattan, the ante has been upped. Eating out, even if you choose less healthy, “cheap” food, is expensive. Everything here is expensive. One time, I paid fifty cents for a few ice cubes. Sooo yeah, you get the gist. And yes, when you’re eating out, no matter where you are, the healthier foods on the menu are typically more expensive. There’s no doubt about that.
But I know my budget, and I know my fitness goals, and I know my dietary needs. Because of all those factors, I don’t eat out very often. Especially not during the work week. You’ll never see me running out to grab a $8 or $9 (or $15!!) lunch, or stopping to grab a quick bagel and coffee at Starbucks on my way to work every morning. Why? Because not only would it be very hard to eat a clean, nutritious diet that way, but it would cost me about $15 a day! That’s like $450 a month, and that is just insane.
I make oatmeal and coffee at home for breakfast, or make overnight oats to bring along if I’m up and out the door super early. Lunch is most likely always packed and toted along. And if I know I’m going to be working late, the same goes for dinner. On Sundays, I prepare dishes that can work as lunches or dinners for throughout the week, that way I don’t even really ever have to think twice about it. Eating healthy on a budget can actually be pretty easy. All you really need is a little bit of planning and a hour or two to prep some meals for the week!
My advice:
Figure out your budget.
Learn what foods make up a nutritious diet.
Learn a few quick and healthy recipes that can be easily packed and transported. (Start here and here.)
Have a general weekly list to follow, but also experiment with new foods every now and then!
Yes, eating healthy and leading a fit life takes a little bit of extra work and preparation. But really, is anything worth doing super-easy? No.

And if all of this will help you stay on track, save money, reach your fitness goals, and most importantly, live healthily, wouldn’t you say it’s worth it? It is to me.
Further reading: Eating Healthy on the Go: Why Prepping and Packing Your Own Food is Always the Better Option
What do you think is the biggest obstacle to eating healthy on a consistent basis?

Eating Healthy on a Budget

One time, someone told me that eating healthy was “too expensive.”

Wait. Just kidding. That’s happened a lot more times than one.

One time, I proved all of the naysayers completely and utterly wrong.

Oh wait. Just kidding again. That didn’t happen just one time. Because I prove them all wrong every Sunday when Breanne and I go food shopping and spend only $40-$55 for an entire weeks worth of food, for two people. Individually, that’s about $20-$25 per week on groceries. That’s $80-$100 per month. Even better, that’s just $2-$4 per day for 3 big, healthy, wholesome meals… AND snacks! Lots of snacks!

This is a rough outline of our weekly grocery list. All of this food feeds me and my roommate Breanne for an entire week. Most weeks we have plenty of food to spare and we carry it over to use in our meals for the next week. For example, a 32oz. Bag of almonds lasts us at least two weeks. As does the same size bag of raisins. Which is why our bill varies from week to week.

But we’ve never spent over $55 in one week. We like to throw new things into the mix every now and then too. Gotta keep it tasty and interesting! Like this week, we invested in a huge butternut squash that was only $2 and a big can of pumpkin puree for baking. (We do lots of baking!)

I know a lot of you are probably thinking, “Hm..This really does not seem like a lot of food.”

Buuut.. it actually is, annnnd what this list doesn’t include (because we don’t need to buy these things on a weekly basis) is some of the other staples in our weekly diet like brown rice, whole wheat pasta, peanut butter, and quinoa, plus cooking staples like spices, oils, and flours. We stock up on those kinds of items in bulk when we need them, so they’re more of a monthly or bi-monthly expense.

One time, (and this time I’m seriously talking about one specific incident) someone told me that eating healthy was too expensive and then admitted to spending $15 on lunch at Whole Foods that day. One meal, for almost as much as I spend on food in a whole week! Uh, yeah.. that is pretty expensive!

Let’s delve more into this topic for a moment.

For those of you who don’t know, I live in Manhattan. And since we’re talking about buying food in Manhattan, the ante has been upped. Eating out, even if you choose less healthy, “cheap” food, is expensive. Everything here is expensive. One time, I paid fifty cents for a few ice cubes. Sooo yeah, you get the gist. And yes, when you’re eating out, no matter where you are, the healthier foods on the menu are typically more expensive. There’s no doubt about that.

But I know my budget, and I know my fitness goals, and I know my dietary needs. Because of all those factors, I don’t eat out very often. Especially not during the work week. You’ll never see me running out to grab a $8 or $9 (or $15!!) lunch, or stopping to grab a quick bagel and coffee at Starbucks on my way to work every morning. Why? Because not only would it be very hard to eat a clean, nutritious diet that way, but it would cost me about $15 a day! That’s like $450 a month, and that is just insane.

I make oatmeal and coffee at home for breakfast, or make overnight oats to bring along if I’m up and out the door super early. Lunch is most likely always packed and toted along. And if I know I’m going to be working late, the same goes for dinner. On Sundays, I prepare dishes that can work as lunches or dinners for throughout the week, that way I don’t even really ever have to think twice about it. Eating healthy on a budget can actually be pretty easy. All you really need is a little bit of planning and a hour or two to prep some meals for the week!

My advice:

  • Figure out your budget.
  • Learn what foods make up a nutritious diet.
  • Learn a few quick and healthy recipes that can be easily packed and transported. (Start here and here.)
  • Have a general weekly list to follow, but also experiment with new foods every now and then!

Yes, eating healthy and leading a fit life takes a little bit of extra work and preparation. But really, is anything worth doing super-easy? No.

And if all of this will help you stay on track, save money, reach your fitness goals, and most importantly, live healthily, wouldn’t you say it’s worth it?

It is to me.

Further reading: Eating Healthy on the Go: Why Prepping and Packing Your Own Food is Always the Better Option

What do you think is the biggest obstacle to eating healthy on a consistent basis?

Hungry Runner Healthy Snack: Salsa-Topped Cucumber Slices
Well, healthy eating doesn’t get much easier than this.
Hungry in between meals?
Grab a cucumber. Slice it up. Top the slices with spoonfuls of salsa.
Just make sure you read the ingredients in the salsa you are using to make sure it’s clean and natural. (And by “natural,” I mean only REAL food was used to make it. No processed sugar or chemicals allowed.)

Hungry Runner Healthy Snack: Salsa-Topped Cucumber Slices

Well, healthy eating doesn’t get much easier than this.

Hungry in between meals?

Grab a cucumber. Slice it up. Top the slices with spoonfuls of salsa.

Just make sure you read the ingredients in the salsa you are using to make sure it’s clean and natural. (And by “natural,” I mean only REAL food was used to make it. No processed sugar or chemicals allowed.)

Veggie-Stuffed Black Bean Burgers
“We need to make black bean burgers for dinner tonight,” my roommate Breanne exclaimed to me early one Friday morning.“I keep passing by this vegetarian food truck that has them on their menu, but it’s like nine bucks for one, which is just out of control,” she told me.


And out of control it certainly is. Because we did end up making our own black bean, veggie burgers that night. Four black bean burgers to be exact, and all for probably under $5. But I won’t put the ridiculously overpriced New York City food to too much shame by getting all technical with exact ingredient cost calculations.
Plus, I’m willing to bet that our burgers were better than the food cart’s. So take that, out of control expensive Manhattan food prices.
Cook at home when you can, kids. It’s healthier, cheaper, and oh-so-much more satisfying.


What you’ll need:


1 sixteen oz. can black beans, drained and rinsed
1/2 large tomato, diced
1/2 ripe avocado, diced
4 garlic cloves, minced
1/2 large red bell pepper, diced
3 generous T flour or oats
1/2 tsp. oregano
dash of chili powder
dash of cumin
dash of salt
dash of pepper
whole wheat or whole grain “buns” (we used pita pockets but any bread of your choice will do)
What to do:
1.) In a medium-sized bowl, mash the black beans using a fork until a pasty mixture is formed. (If you have a food processor you can use it to pulse the beans until they are mashed well.)
2.) Toss in the remaining ingredients, except for the flour or oats, and mix until everything is well blended.
3.) Add the flour or oats one tablespoon at a time, mixing well before adding the next.
4.) Sprinkle in a few more dashes of each spice and mix one more time.
5.) Using your hands, shape the mixture into 4 separate patties.
6.) Place patties on a greased pan and bake at 350 degrees for 7-10 minutes. Flip patties and bake on other side for another 7-10 minutes.
7.) Serve with toppings of your choice! We used avocado slices, tomato, red onion, and fresh Dijon mustard!
*Note: Baking these worked but I suspect that they might come out better being grilled, either on an outdoor BBQ or even a George Foreman grill. They held together, but were still a little bit too soft. It might even work better to cook them over the stove top in a frying pan. Next time I make these I’ll be experimenting with grilling them on my George Foreman Grill.

Veggie-Stuffed Black Bean Burgers

“We need to make black bean burgers for dinner tonight,” my roommate Breanne exclaimed to me early one Friday morning.

“I keep passing by this vegetarian food truck that has them on their menu, but it’s like nine bucks for one, which is just out of control,” she told me.

And out of control it certainly is. Because we did end up making our own black bean, veggie burgers that night. Four black bean burgers to be exact, and all for probably under $5. But I won’t put the ridiculously overpriced New York City food to too much shame by getting all technical with exact ingredient cost calculations.

Plus, I’m willing to bet that our burgers were better than the food cart’s. So take that, out of control expensive Manhattan food prices.

Cook at home when you can, kids. It’s healthier, cheaper, and oh-so-much more satisfying.

What you’ll need:

1 sixteen oz. can black beans, drained and rinsed

1/2 large tomato, diced

1/2 ripe avocado, diced

4 garlic cloves, minced

1/2 large red bell pepper, diced

3 generous T flour or oats

1/2 tsp. oregano

dash of chili powder

dash of cumin

dash of salt

dash of pepper

whole wheat or whole grain “buns” (we used pita pockets but any bread of your choice will do)

What to do:

1.) In a medium-sized bowl, mash the black beans using a fork until a pasty mixture is formed. (If you have a food processor you can use it to pulse the beans until they are mashed well.)

2.) Toss in the remaining ingredients, except for the flour or oats, and mix until everything is well blended.

3.) Add the flour or oats one tablespoon at a time, mixing well before adding the next.

4.) Sprinkle in a few more dashes of each spice and mix one more time.

5.) Using your hands, shape the mixture into 4 separate patties.

6.) Place patties on a greased pan and bake at 350 degrees for 7-10 minutes. Flip patties and bake on other side for another 7-10 minutes.

7.) Serve with toppings of your choice! We used avocado slices, tomato, red onion, and fresh Dijon mustard!

*Note: Baking these worked but I suspect that they might come out better being grilled, either on an outdoor BBQ or even a George Foreman grill. They held together, but were still a little bit too soft. It might even work better to cook them over the stove top in a frying pan. Next time I make these I’ll be experimenting with grilling them on my George Foreman Grill.

Black Bean Veggie Wraps with Avocado Cream Dressing

This recipe is the very first dinner my roommate Breanne and I made in our apartment together.

We’re not messing around with the whole healthy eating thing here.

Even upon just having moved in, we made sure to have plenty of healthy options in stock.

We weren’t about to settle for something simple like peanut butter and jelly or mac and cheese, like most maybe would while still getting settled in.

No. We cooked. We cooked up a healthy little storm. And even though we didn’t even have a real table to eat off of yet, we enjoyed every last delicious bite.

I know you will to ;)

What you’ll need:

For the wrap filling

2 whole wheat wraps

1/2 can black beans, drained and rinsed

1/2 can chic peas, drained

1/2 red bell pepper, chopped

1/2 yellow bell pepper, chopped

1 ear of corn, kernels scraped off the cob

1/3 cup chopped purple onion

2 T olive oil

dash of cumin

dash of turmeric

dash of garlic poweder

For the Avocado Cream:

1/2 avocado, chopped and mashed well

1/2 tablespoon lime juice

1/8 cup grapeseed oil (or other neutral oil)

1/4 tsp. salt

1/2 tsp. sweetener (original recipe called for agave nectar, I used real maple syrup)

1-2 T plain Greek yogurt (depending on desired consistency)

What to do:

1.) Heat the olive oil and onion in a skillet over medium heat for 1-2 minutes. Add in corn and bell peppers. Saute for 3-4 minutes, stirring and sprinkling with cumin, turmeric, and garlic powder.

2.) To make the avocado cream, mix the mashed avocado, lime juice, grapeseed oil, salt, syrup, and Greek yogurt in a small dish. Stir until everything is very well combined. (The more Greek yogurt you add, the creamier and more tart the dressing will be.)

3. Place the cooked veggies on a whole wheat wrap, top with avocado cream, wrap and serve.

(Avocado Cream Recipe adapted from The Realistic Nutritionist)

Creative Commons License
The Hungry Runner by Katie is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.