Hungry Runner

Since I’ve started commuting to work from Long Island, as part of my marathon training, three days a week I’ve been waking up to run at 5 a.m. Exercising in the morning: it isn’t always easy to get out of bed, but I never regret it when I do.

Everyone asks me, “How do you do it?” and sometimes I don’t really know the answer to that question. Sometimes it’s a simple as, I just do. There are a few ways to look at it that help motivate me, though:

  • My performance on race day will suffer if I don’t do this. Not that I’m gunning for any world records or anything, but I do want to finish the marathon in one piece, and preferably in under 5 hours.
  • I know myself; I’m much more likely to say “Screw it, I’ll watch Netflix instead” when I get home from work and I’m exhausted from writing and riding the train all day.
  • After working out I’ll feel more energized for the morning and I’ll be more productive at work.
  • It’s one less thing I’ll have to worry about checking off my To Do list later in the day. This is not so much a “let me just get it over with” mindset as it is a strategy for making the flow and productivity of my day easier.
  • “Your alarm just went off and you’re awake already, so just get the hell out of bed.” (This only works about 10% of the time.)

Continue reading…

101 Bodyweight Exercises That You Can Do Anywhere- Travel Strong

The whole point of this list was to help you make your workouts challenging and fun. You can incorporate these bodyweight exercises into a pre-existing routine, or create a completely new workout made up of exercises that you haven’t tried before.
My suggestion is to use the table below to pick an exercise from each category that you think you might be able to perform for the target reps/time, and create a circuit with the exercises in the same order as they are in the table. 
If your goal is to lose weight, perform the target number of reps, rest for 30 seconds, and then move on to the next exercise. After completing the last exercise, return to the start do begin your second circuit. Do a total of 3.
If your goal is to build muscle, do 3 sets of the target number of reps/time before moving on to the next exercise. Rest for 2-3 minutes between exercises and sets. Once you’ve done your last set of the last exercise on the list, the workout is over.
Once you can perform an exercise for the target number of reps, for each set of the workout, move on to the next exercise in the list for that category. This is how you introduce the principle of progressive overload to bodyweight training.
Do these workouts every other day. It’s crucial that you rest.

101 Bodyweight Exercises That You Can Do Anywhere- Travel Strong

The whole point of this list was to help you make your workouts challenging and fun. You can incorporate these bodyweight exercises into a pre-existing routine, or create a completely new workout made up of exercises that you haven’t tried before.

My suggestion is to use the table below to pick an exercise from each category that you think you might be able to perform for the target reps/time, and create a circuit with the exercises in the same order as they are in the table. 

  • If your goal is to lose weight, perform the target number of reps, rest for 30 seconds, and then move on to the next exercise. After completing the last exercise, return to the start do begin your second circuit. Do a total of 3.
  • If your goal is to build muscle, do 3 sets of the target number of reps/time before moving on to the next exercise. Rest for 2-3 minutes between exercises and sets. Once you’ve done your last set of the last exercise on the list, the workout is over.
  • Once you can perform an exercise for the target number of reps, for each set of the workout, move on to the next exercise in the list for that category. This is how you introduce the principle of progressive overload to bodyweight training.
  • Do these workouts every other day. It’s crucial that you rest.

Experts reveal why spending more time outside is essential to your health.

Be honest, how often do you stop and take a moment to really appreciate the great outdoors? Whether you live in New York City or Colorado, every time you step outside you’re greeted by shining sun (most days, hopefully), swaying trees and curious creatures.

Sure, some areas are more “green” than others—spotting a bald eagle in your backyard is arguably more exciting than trying to shoo away pigeons on a city sidewalk —but no matter where you reside you’re sure to be surrounded by some aspect of nature, which is good news because time spent outside is almost directly related to your overall health and wellbeing.

And according to recent research, when you combine that time spent outside with physical activity, the effects are incomparable.

“In a 2011 meta-analysis of relevant studies, researchers concluded that compared to indoor workouts, exercising outside causes greater engagement and revitalization, lowers depression and increases a person’s enjoyment of the activity,” says health and fitness expert Mark Sisson, author of The Primal Blueprint and creator ofMarksDailyApple.com. “People who exercise outside are also more likely to repeat the exercise at a later date. Outdoor workouts don’t feel like work. They’re more fun, and they perpetuate themselves.”

Continue reading…

(Source: theactivetimes.com)

A fitness professional discusses the benefits of working out with the sunrise.

I wish more people knew how great waking up early for exercise can be.OK, maybe the waking up part isn’t so great. But the exercising part definitely is.  

That’s when I got in touch with Ed Gober, New York Health and Racquet Club’s Director of Personal Training. His 20 years of expertise in the health and fitness industry helped me dig a little bit deeper into the topic.

Read more…

(Source: theactivetimes.com)

Running: You actually used to hate running, but for some reason that even you don’t understand you stuck with it, and once you experienced your first runner’s high you never looked back. Now you own at least four pairs of sneakers, but it’s not wasteful because you wear them all on a regular basis. You also own more moisture-wicking garments than regular clothing and you don’t care who knows it. 
Read more…

Running: You actually used to hate running, but for some reason that even you don’t understand you stuck with it, and once you experienced your first runner’s high you never looked back. Now you own at least four pairs of sneakers, but it’s not wasteful because you wear them all on a regular basis. You also own more moisture-wicking garments than regular clothing and you don’t care who knows it. 

Read more…

Creative Commons License
The Hungry Runner by Katie is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.