Hungry Runner

"It’s one of the first things we learn in school: Everyone is different. And it’s especially true when it comes to health and fitness. Our bodies react differently to certain types of training. Our stomachs handle different foods in a variety of ways. Some of us are excited for a workout that others dread. Unfortunately this kind of nuance tends to be absent from marketing and advertising, and we’re lead to believe that a given product is just perfect for us, no matter who we are or what we need.

But if that were truly the case, we would have cracked the code to health and happiness long ago, and no one would be struggling with their weight, their health, or even their body image the way so many of us are today.

The truth? The best diet and the best workout program are the ones you can stick with. Each of us needs to find a workout program that we can consistently do. We need to get our bodies adapted to moving every single day. And we each need to find a way of eating healthy that works well within our lifestyle day in and day out."

One Size Does Not Fit All: How to Find the Best Health and Fitness Routine for You- Greatist

101 Bodyweight Exercises That You Can Do Anywhere- Travel Strong

The whole point of this list was to help you make your workouts challenging and fun. You can incorporate these bodyweight exercises into a pre-existing routine, or create a completely new workout made up of exercises that you haven’t tried before.
My suggestion is to use the table below to pick an exercise from each category that you think you might be able to perform for the target reps/time, and create a circuit with the exercises in the same order as they are in the table. 
If your goal is to lose weight, perform the target number of reps, rest for 30 seconds, and then move on to the next exercise. After completing the last exercise, return to the start do begin your second circuit. Do a total of 3.
If your goal is to build muscle, do 3 sets of the target number of reps/time before moving on to the next exercise. Rest for 2-3 minutes between exercises and sets. Once you’ve done your last set of the last exercise on the list, the workout is over.
Once you can perform an exercise for the target number of reps, for each set of the workout, move on to the next exercise in the list for that category. This is how you introduce the principle of progressive overload to bodyweight training.
Do these workouts every other day. It’s crucial that you rest.

101 Bodyweight Exercises That You Can Do Anywhere- Travel Strong

The whole point of this list was to help you make your workouts challenging and fun. You can incorporate these bodyweight exercises into a pre-existing routine, or create a completely new workout made up of exercises that you haven’t tried before.

My suggestion is to use the table below to pick an exercise from each category that you think you might be able to perform for the target reps/time, and create a circuit with the exercises in the same order as they are in the table. 

  • If your goal is to lose weight, perform the target number of reps, rest for 30 seconds, and then move on to the next exercise. After completing the last exercise, return to the start do begin your second circuit. Do a total of 3.
  • If your goal is to build muscle, do 3 sets of the target number of reps/time before moving on to the next exercise. Rest for 2-3 minutes between exercises and sets. Once you’ve done your last set of the last exercise on the list, the workout is over.
  • Once you can perform an exercise for the target number of reps, for each set of the workout, move on to the next exercise in the list for that category. This is how you introduce the principle of progressive overload to bodyweight training.
  • Do these workouts every other day. It’s crucial that you rest.

1. I hope the instructor isn’t too into yoga. I’m so not in the mood for Ohm right now.

2. Quick! Grab that last spot in the back row.

3. Let me just squeeze my mat in right here. I’m not too close to the guy next to me right? Nah. I definitely fit.

4. I hope he doesn’t sweat on my mat, though.

5. Ugh! Maybe I should just move up to the front where there’s more space.

6. No, then I might offend this guy. People might think I’m weird. Better just stay put.

7. Ok. I guess I’ll stretch a little before we get started.

8. Is that lady meditating or taking a nap?

Continue reading…

(Source: theactivetimes.com)

micdotcom:

Which sport requires you to be the most fit? Check this chart
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Umm, what about running?!

Experts reveal why spending more time outside is essential to your health.

Be honest, how often do you stop and take a moment to really appreciate the great outdoors? Whether you live in New York City or Colorado, every time you step outside you’re greeted by shining sun (most days, hopefully), swaying trees and curious creatures.

Sure, some areas are more “green” than others—spotting a bald eagle in your backyard is arguably more exciting than trying to shoo away pigeons on a city sidewalk —but no matter where you reside you’re sure to be surrounded by some aspect of nature, which is good news because time spent outside is almost directly related to your overall health and wellbeing.

And according to recent research, when you combine that time spent outside with physical activity, the effects are incomparable.

“In a 2011 meta-analysis of relevant studies, researchers concluded that compared to indoor workouts, exercising outside causes greater engagement and revitalization, lowers depression and increases a person’s enjoyment of the activity,” says health and fitness expert Mark Sisson, author of The Primal Blueprint and creator ofMarksDailyApple.com. “People who exercise outside are also more likely to repeat the exercise at a later date. Outdoor workouts don’t feel like work. They’re more fun, and they perpetuate themselves.”

Continue reading…

(Source: theactivetimes.com)

Learning to love exercise is actually pretty easy; all you have to do is participate in activities that you enjoy. Unfortunately, for most, sometimes even that’s not quite enough to keep going on a long term basis. (I love to run, but that doesn’t stop me from really hating it and skipping workouts sometimes.)

Inevitably, boredom almost always sets in, and boredom is easily one of the best ways to quickly kill a healthy exercise habit. That’s why variety is equally as important as enthusiasm.

But aside from figuring out which activities you love most and keeping your routine fun and fresh, there’s another step you can take to make sure that your relationship with exercise stays strong.

When I spoke with expert running coach Eric Orton, I asked him what he thought was the one lesson or rule about running that had always held true through all the years he’s spent training and coaching.

I was surprised to find that his insightful answer extends way beyond the realm of running. It applies to all sports, or any type of exercise really.

Continue reading…

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The Hungry Runner by Katie is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.