Hungry Runner

theactivetimes:

Tips and tricks you can use to improve your health and fitness everyday

When I decided to become a certified personal trainer, I did it not only because I wanted to expand my own knowledge of health and fitness, but more so because I wanted a career that would allow me to help others learn how to lead healthier lives.

I studied text books, I took classes and I worked one-on-one with my own trainer to learn about everything from human anatomy to proper exercise form and sports nutrition to coaching techniques.

There was (and still is) so much for me to learn, and while the books taught me the basics, I found that the most important lessons (the ones we can all use in everyday life) were learned after I passed my test and finally began working with clients.

After a few years on the gym floor, I decided I wanted to spread my knowledge of health and fitness even further through another interest of mine—writing.

It’s been a while since I’ve worked with clients of my own, but just like all of the exercise terms I memorized when I was studying for my certification test, during the time I spent as a trainer, a few important lessons about health and fitness were embedded in my brain.

Interestingly enough, as I continue to read and write about health and fitness, the same themes seem to reappear constantly. And the best part about it all is that you can use them to improve your own health and fitness every day.

These are the most important lessons I learned while working in the gym.

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(Source: theactivetimes.com)

Tags: fitblr fitness

Experts weigh in on some of the biggest myths about health and fitness.

Myth: Running is bad for your knees.

"Running has long been thought to cause damage to the knees from all the pounding you experience with each foot strike,” says Jason Fitzgerald, a 2:39 marathoner and the founder of Strength Running. “But in the past decade, multiple studies have shown that long-time runners have no increased risk of knee damage. And those with a history of knee arthritis don’t have much of a history with running! In fact, running can even be healthy for the knee, promoting cartilage repair in the knee. Of course, we’re talking about moderate running here—if you’re running marathons or workouts at 6:00 mile pace or faster, you could be increasing your risk of knee arthritis.”

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(Source: theactivetimes.com)

I’m Back in Action + An Exciting Announcement!
Oh man, guys. I feel like I’ve died and come back to life.

So, about two weeks ago I wrote about how I came down with the flu after attempting my 18 mile training run. When I wrote that blog post I had already been sick for a few days and at that point was finally feeling better. In fact, that weekend Mark came down and we saw Gone Girl (so good!) and then went bowling…. I was feeling pretty good again!
Then on Monday I woke up to go to work expecting to feel 100% like myself again, only I was still feeling a little off.
Read more…

I’m Back in Action + An Exciting Announcement!

Oh man, guys. I feel like I’ve died and come back to life.

So, about two weeks ago I wrote about how I came down with the flu after attempting my 18 mile training run. When I wrote that blog post I had already been sick for a few days and at that point was finally feeling better. In fact, that weekend Mark came down and we saw Gone Girl (so good!) and then went bowling…. I was feeling pretty good again!

Then on Monday I woke up to go to work expecting to feel 100% like myself again, only I was still feeling a little off.

Read more…

Any serious athlete knows that rest, recovery, and periodization (smartly modifying intensity based on goals, performance, and ability) are absolutely crucial to optimal performance (aka kicking ass).

There is a massive trend in the fitness industry to glorify exercise as an all-out war on the body. I call it the militarization of fitness—all the boot camps, Marine-inspired workouts, ridiculously intense body building routines, and general glorification of pain. Even our recovery and regeneration techniques are prioritized by how painful they are. (Got a knot in your hip flexor? Go roll that sh!t with a baseball!)

This trend is a symptom of a much larger disease. We live in a culture obsessed with aggression, and it has found its way into every facet of our lives, even our workouts.

Since I’ve started commuting to work from Long Island, as part of my marathon training, three days a week I’ve been waking up to run at 5 a.m. Exercising in the morning: it isn’t always easy to get out of bed, but I never regret it when I do.

Everyone asks me, “How do you do it?” and sometimes I don’t really know the answer to that question. Sometimes it’s a simple as, I just do. There are a few ways to look at it that help motivate me, though:

  • My performance on race day will suffer if I don’t do this. Not that I’m gunning for any world records or anything, but I do want to finish the marathon in one piece, and preferably in under 5 hours.
  • I know myself; I’m much more likely to say “Screw it, I’ll watch Netflix instead” when I get home from work and I’m exhausted from writing and riding the train all day.
  • After working out I’ll feel more energized for the morning and I’ll be more productive at work.
  • It’s one less thing I’ll have to worry about checking off my To Do list later in the day. This is not so much a “let me just get it over with” mindset as it is a strategy for making the flow and productivity of my day easier.
  • “Your alarm just went off and you’re awake already, so just get the hell out of bed.” (This only works about 10% of the time.)

Continue reading…

3. Readjust your mindset.
Don’t think of certain foods as “healthy” or “unhealthy,” evaluate them by their nutritional value instead; part of developing a healthy relationship with food means not thinking of a food that’s less nutritious as “bad,” but rather, just not the best choice. It’s OK to treat yourself to foods like cookies, cake, chips or ice cream sometimes, but it’s also important to make sure that you don’t ever feel badly about eating them. If you eat nutritiously for the majority of the time, a few treats here or there won’t negatively affect your health or fitness.

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