Hungry Runner

Any serious athlete knows that rest, recovery, and periodization (smartly modifying intensity based on goals, performance, and ability) are absolutely crucial to optimal performance (aka kicking ass).

There is a massive trend in the fitness industry to glorify exercise as an all-out war on the body. I call it the militarization of fitness—all the boot camps, Marine-inspired workouts, ridiculously intense body building routines, and general glorification of pain. Even our recovery and regeneration techniques are prioritized by how painful they are. (Got a knot in your hip flexor? Go roll that sh!t with a baseball!)

This trend is a symptom of a much larger disease. We live in a culture obsessed with aggression, and it has found its way into every facet of our lives, even our workouts.

Since I’ve started commuting to work from Long Island, as part of my marathon training, three days a week I’ve been waking up to run at 5 a.m. Exercising in the morning: it isn’t always easy to get out of bed, but I never regret it when I do.

Everyone asks me, “How do you do it?” and sometimes I don’t really know the answer to that question. Sometimes it’s a simple as, I just do. There are a few ways to look at it that help motivate me, though:

  • My performance on race day will suffer if I don’t do this. Not that I’m gunning for any world records or anything, but I do want to finish the marathon in one piece, and preferably in under 5 hours.
  • I know myself; I’m much more likely to say “Screw it, I’ll watch Netflix instead” when I get home from work and I’m exhausted from writing and riding the train all day.
  • After working out I’ll feel more energized for the morning and I’ll be more productive at work.
  • It’s one less thing I’ll have to worry about checking off my To Do list later in the day. This is not so much a “let me just get it over with” mindset as it is a strategy for making the flow and productivity of my day easier.
  • “Your alarm just went off and you’re awake already, so just get the hell out of bed.” (This only works about 10% of the time.)

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3. Readjust your mindset.
Don’t think of certain foods as “healthy” or “unhealthy,” evaluate them by their nutritional value instead; part of developing a healthy relationship with food means not thinking of a food that’s less nutritious as “bad,” but rather, just not the best choice. It’s OK to treat yourself to foods like cookies, cake, chips or ice cream sometimes, but it’s also important to make sure that you don’t ever feel badly about eating them. If you eat nutritiously for the majority of the time, a few treats here or there won’t negatively affect your health or fitness.

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madsweat:

Fast Fact: High-intensity workouts are all the rage right now, but did you know that lower-intensity workouts still burn calories, strengthen our endurance, and produce enough endorphins to leave us with a comfortable exercise high? Don’t be afraid to switch up your routine and try out new types of workouts! http://bit.ly/1qch0S0.

madsweat:

Fast Fact: High-intensity workouts are all the rage right now, but did you know that lower-intensity workouts still burn calories, strengthen our endurance, and produce enough endorphins to leave us with a comfortable exercise high? Don’t be afraid to switch up your routine and try out new types of workouts! http://bit.ly/1qch0S0.

Are your fitness goals failing because they’re impossible?

Did you ever stop to consider the fact that, no matter how hard you try, the reason you can’t seem to reach the results you want is because your goal is actually unrealistic?

With so many misconceptions and crazy claims about fitness being thrown about popular culture, it’s completely possible that you’ve set out to achieve a feat that’s pretty much impossible.

It doesn’t mean you should give up, though. It just means that you may need to adjust your expectations; reevaluate your objectives and come up with a new plan that will help you achieve your fitness ambitions in a reasonable and realistic fashion.

Not sure whether or not you’re on the right path? That’s OK. We’ve rounded up a list of some of the most common fitness goals that lead many to frustration and disappointment because they’re generally unrealistic and impractical.

Continue reading to find out which intents are probably impossible. 

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“If you are someone who’s been struggling with your weight your whole life, just know this— all you have to do is just a few things every day and remain consistent, and time will fly just a fast as it flies whether you’re working hard or not,” he said.

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(Source: theactivetimes.com)

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The Hungry Runner by Katie is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.