Hungry Runner

the-exercist:

"Honestly, what is that extra hour rolling in your bed going to achieve compared to a solid workout?"
Let’s take a minute to talk about what sleep achieves:
Improved short-term and long-term memory
Lowered risk of infection
Lowered risk of heart disease
Lowered risk of diabetes
Increased life span
Decreased inflammation
Increased levels of creativity
Longer attention span and increased attentiveness
Increased efficiency of vaccinations
Regulation of hormones
Increased ability to balance a healthy bodyweight
Lowered stress levels
Decreased likelihood of depression or mood disorders
Giving up sleep in order to exercise is not an inherently good decision. You need that time to rest your body and recover from the day before. If you aren’t getting enough sleep, then increasing your activity is going to be incredibly dangerous. It can negatively impact both your mental wellbeing and your physical health. So giving up sleep in order to garner the benefits of exercise? That can be like shooting yourself in the foot.
Of course, there are a lot of cases where getting up a little early for exercise is going to be a good thing. This works well for some people. But there are just as many cases where getting up early would hurt someone. That extra hour might be completely necessary for their health. 
So don’t feel bullied into starting an early exercise schedule or cutting your sleep short so that you can get to the gym. The average person needs a solid 7-8 hours every night. Not 7-8 hours of tossing and turning, not lying in bed for 7-8 hours - Actually sleeping that long. If you’re consistently tired and don’t feel rested, then exercise will not inherently help you. Make sure you’re consciously evaluating your routine and know if getting up even earlier would bring some benefits. 
Resources: 
Huffington Post
NIH
Harvard.edu
WedMD
MUSCHealth

See also: The Health Benefits of a Good Night’s Sleep

the-exercist:

"Honestly, what is that extra hour rolling in your bed going to achieve compared to a solid workout?"

Let’s take a minute to talk about what sleep achieves:

  • Improved short-term and long-term memory
  • Lowered risk of infection
  • Lowered risk of heart disease
  • Lowered risk of diabetes
  • Increased life span
  • Decreased inflammation
  • Increased levels of creativity
  • Longer attention span and increased attentiveness
  • Increased efficiency of vaccinations
  • Regulation of hormones
  • Increased ability to balance a healthy bodyweight
  • Lowered stress levels
  • Decreased likelihood of depression or mood disorders

Giving up sleep in order to exercise is not an inherently good decision. You need that time to rest your body and recover from the day before. If you aren’t getting enough sleep, then increasing your activity is going to be incredibly dangerous. It can negatively impact both your mental wellbeing and your physical health. So giving up sleep in order to garner the benefits of exercise? That can be like shooting yourself in the foot.

Of course, there are a lot of cases where getting up a little early for exercise is going to be a good thing. This works well for some people. But there are just as many cases where getting up early would hurt someone. That extra hour might be completely necessary for their health. 

So don’t feel bullied into starting an early exercise schedule or cutting your sleep short so that you can get to the gym. The average person needs a solid 7-8 hours every night. Not 7-8 hours of tossing and turning, not lying in bed for 7-8 hours - Actually sleeping that long. If you’re consistently tired and don’t feel rested, then exercise will not inherently help you. Make sure you’re consciously evaluating your routine and know if getting up even earlier would bring some benefits. 

Resources: 

See also: The Health Benefits of a Good Night’s Sleep

(Source: fit-and-hip)

Before I got into the health and fitness field, I never really knew just how important sleep is when it comes to overall health and well being. 

I’ve been writing a lot about the importance of sleep over the past few weeks and learning everything I have, including the mind-blowing statistics from this Huffington Post piece, I’ve been very adamant about getting 8 hours every night. 

Educate yourself and if you have trouble getting to bed on time or falling asleep when you do, try an easy yoga practice (see the linked story) as part of your before bed routine. 

Stay healthy, Hungry Readers!

The Health Benefits of Sleep
8 Before Bed Habits for a Better Night’s Sleep
13 Tips for Getting a Better Night’s Sleep

(Source: theactivetimes.com)

The Importance of Protecting Your Bone Density
After finishing the Scranton Half Marathon two weekends ago I promptly stuffed my face with 7 orange slices and a chewy bar and then I called my mom.

I let her know how the run went and told her that it was a lot of fun; typical post-race fodder. Then she started talking about her day. She told me she skipped the appointment she had scheduled for a bone density test because a friend told her she didn’t need to get that checked yet. I started ranting.
Continue reading…

The Importance of Protecting Your Bone Density

After finishing the Scranton Half Marathon two weekends ago I promptly stuffed my face with 7 orange slices and a chewy bar and then I called my mom.

I let her know how the run went and told her that it was a lot of fun; typical post-race fodder. Then she started talking about her day. She told me she skipped the appointment she had scheduled for a bone density test because a friend told her she didn’t need to get that checked yet. I started ranting.

Continue reading…

(Source: hungry-runner.com)

policymic:

Here’s what sleep deprivation is doing to your body

Not getting enough sleep? Just one week of sleeping fewer than six hours per night can lead to serious health issues, including the modification of over 700 genes, reports the Huffington Post on a study published in PNAS last year. Other symptoms of chronic sleep deprivation include everything from bloodshot eyes to quadrupled stroke risk. This infographic fromHuffington Post’s Alissa Scheller explains.
Read more


Sleep is just as important to your health as exercise and a wholesome diet!

policymic:

Here’s what sleep deprivation is doing to your body

Not getting enough sleep? Just one week of sleeping fewer than six hours per night can lead to serious health issues, including the modification of over 700 genes, reports the Huffington Post on a study published in PNAS last year. Other symptoms of chronic sleep deprivation include everything from bloodshot eyes to quadrupled stroke risk. This infographic fromHuffington Post’s Alissa Scheller explains.

Read more

Sleep is just as important to your health as exercise and a wholesome diet!

Fitter, faster, bigger, better, slimmer, stronger; everyone’s fitness goals are different, but the reasons why we struggle to accomplish them are usually the same. Part of the problem is that we expect success to come easily, but become exceedingly disappointed when it doesn’t. (Hint: For the most part, nothing worth achieving ever comes easy.)

According to Dr.Denise McGuire, PhD, a licensed psychologist and emotional fitness coach with over 25 years of experience and a presenter at last year’s Fitness and Health Social Media Conferenceat the Anschutz Health and Wellness Center in Aurora, Colorado, fewer than 20% of people in a problem population are ready to take action to change.

That means even though you might have the desire to lose weight, incorporate healthier habits into your day-to-day life, or even break a personal record in your 5k, your past attempts have failed simply because you weren’t ready to follow through with the complicated process that brings about true, maintainable change.

When it comes to accomplishing a goal, McGuire says we often fail to achieve real progress because we underestimate just how difficult it is to break old habits. She says that we tend to think the process will be simple and that successful transformation only requires willpower and self-discipline.

Psychological science has proven quite the contrary, though. According to the Prochaska’s Readiness for Change (or transtheoretical) model, whether or not you’ll successfully achieve a goal depends on where you fall within the model’s five stages.

Continue reading…

(Source: theactivetimes.com)

wheniwasayoungwarth0g asked: I eat healthy food, and a good amount, but lately I haven't been feeling full or satisfied. Any tips?

hungryrunner:

Good question! I’ve definitely experienced this before and found that it can be for a number of different reasons. Here are my suggestions:

Eat your meals more slowly: Like, much more slowly. Check out this article in the NY Times about “Mindful Eating.” It’s a hard habit to develop and hold onto, but I’ve recently tried it with a few meals and it really does make you feel more full & satisfied.

Is it emotional?: If you just ate but still feel hungry or unsatisfied, stop and ask yourself: “Am I really hungry? Or am I bored, sad, anxious, or wanting to eat more for some other reason besides actual hunger? Try and figure out the answer and drink a glass of water while you ponder. If you’re not really hungry the feeling will pass.

Eat what you want: If you feel unsatisfied often, it could be because even though you’re eating healthily, you’re not giving your body what it craves. I’m not trying to say go eat a bunch of candy or cookies every time your sweet tooth kicks in. What I mean is, if  you’re craving a cheeseburger or a piece of pizza but you had been planning on eating something light like a salad, just go for the hamburger or the pizza and enjoy it. If you actually feel satisfied you won’t be inclined to snack or binge after your meal. But only do this every once in a while. You can’t give into your cravings every time they come creeping up, but you also can’t completely disregard them.


Make sure you’re getting enough calories: You might think that you’re eating enough but everyone needs at least 1,200 a day and if you’re exercising you will probably need more. Cassy from Blogiates shows you how to calculate your BMR (Basal Metabolic Rate) so you can find out how many calories you need per day based on your body type and level of physical activity.

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