Hungry Runner

"

There are entire industries profiting from our belief that we are out of control and must be led by the nose. These industries collect massive amounts of money by making up rules that don’t exist and selling them to people who don’t need them.

Obviously, the propaganda works. And if it works on you, you needn’t feel alone — it works on all of us, myself included. A sustained, positive effort is necessary to work against it.

This is where normal, dare-I-say-it, healthy eating starts. Not with rules. Not with food guides.

But with media literacy.

With skeptical inquiry and critical thinking.

And, lastly, with this whole self-determination thing.

"

The Rules of Nutrition- The Fat Nutritionist

[via fitvillains & rockstarkate]
"

Are there ways to eat which will (potentially) optimize your functioning while minimizing (your immediate and long-term risks of) certain diseases?

Probably.

Are there ways to eat which will (possibly) undermine your functioning while increasing (your risk of) disease?

Probably.

And why do I say probably instead of striking out with a sexy, definitive Yes?

Because, while these are likely results, they are not inevitabilities. They are not laws. This is not a2 + b2 = c2.

It’s more like a2 + b2 = c probably, maybe, if x, y, and z are also present.

Because — let’s go back to being obvious again — people are different.

If you’re shopping for laws, try here. Take a good look. Notice there’s not one piece of dietary advice among them.

Why am I telling you all this? So you’ll have absolutely no idea now what to do with your eating, and throw your hands up in despair and head for the nearest Cinnabon, because, fuck it, there are no rules?

No.

(Though if you’re tempted to do just that, I’ll totally understand.)

I’m telling you this because it is crucial that you be the one to decide.

I’m telling you this because you are in charge of this particular voyage, cap’n.

I’m telling you this because it is critical that humans operate on the basis of autonomy.

And I’m telling you this because you make the rules.

That Ultimate Authority? That guru, or nutritionist, or Oprah-certified megalomaniac you’ve been searching for all this time? Because you’re that desperate for someone to tell you what to do?

It’s you.

"

The Rules of Nutrition- The Fat Nutritionist

size10plz:

loveyourselfcompletely:

runtilyouredone:

runningtothefinish:

This is from her video about top 5 tips to lose weight….
What about eating fruit will stop anyone from losing weight?!
*facepalm*
Pretty sure it’s more ideal for someone to grab fruit as a snack or dessert (or for me sometimes a meal) than “filling up” on beef and broccoli
Nothing against Casey, she’s a great role model for many people but she’s trying to make people think that eating fruit past 2 pm will make them hold on to those sugars and carbs and restrict them from losing weight and I just disagree with that completely.

I honestly believe that rules are the downfall of a normal and healthy diet. Whether you’re a vegan or you’re keto or anywhere in between, eat what and when and how you want when you’re hungry.

a-FREAKING-MEN to these two comments. I hated when I was personal training and my clients were so confused on what to eat. Like “Well, I can’t eat fruit at night, what else do I do if I’m craving something sweet!?”
eat “clean” foods that are not processed as much as you want. as for everything else, moderation is the only thing that matters. if you need to eat a pizza, twelve donuts, and a new born for your mental health, then I better see some pizza sauce and powdered sugar on your shirt you hot piece of ass.

There isn’t any known study that actually proves that you shouldn’t eat fruit after 2pm at all. 
Honestly, don’t take blogilates food advice for weight loss since she has no formal training on the matter and this is just sensationalized diet culture bullshit. She’s a pilates instructor/personal trainer, not a dietitian. Just because they’re into fitness and does that for their job doesn’t mean that they actually know proper nutrition. 


Thank you! I was complaining to my roommate about this at the breakfast table yesterday morning as I watched this video. I’d like to repeat one of the above comments:

"I honestly believe that rules are the downfall of a normal and healthy diet. Whether you’re a vegan or you’re keto or anywhere in between, eat what and when and how you want when you’re hungry."

size10plz:

loveyourselfcompletely:

runtilyouredone:

runningtothefinish:

This is from her video about top 5 tips to lose weight….

What about eating fruit will stop anyone from losing weight?!

*facepalm*

Pretty sure it’s more ideal for someone to grab fruit as a snack or dessert (or for me sometimes a meal) than “filling up” on beef and broccoli

Nothing against Casey, she’s a great role model for many people but she’s trying to make people think that eating fruit past 2 pm will make them hold on to those sugars and carbs and restrict them from losing weight and I just disagree with that completely.

I honestly believe that rules are the downfall of a normal and healthy diet. Whether you’re a vegan or you’re keto or anywhere in between, eat what and when and how you want when you’re hungry.

a-FREAKING-MEN to these two comments. I hated when I was personal training and my clients were so confused on what to eat. Like “Well, I can’t eat fruit at night, what else do I do if I’m craving something sweet!?”

eat “clean” foods that are not processed as much as you want. as for everything else, moderation is the only thing that matters. if you need to eat a pizza, twelve donuts, and a new born for your mental health, then I better see some pizza sauce and powdered sugar on your shirt you hot piece of ass.

There isn’t any known study that actually proves that you shouldn’t eat fruit after 2pm at all. 

Honestly, don’t take blogilates food advice for weight loss since she has no formal training on the matter and this is just sensationalized diet culture bullshit. She’s a pilates instructor/personal trainer, not a dietitian. Just because they’re into fitness and does that for their job doesn’t mean that they actually know proper nutrition. 

Thank you! I was complaining to my roommate about this at the breakfast table yesterday morning as I watched this video. I’d like to repeat one of the above comments: "I honestly believe that rules are the downfall of a normal and healthy diet. Whether you’re a vegan or you’re keto or anywhere in between, eat what and when and how you want when you’re hungry."

(via the-exercist)

"Yes, I eat pizza and cupcakes and ice cream and doughnuts and all of that good stuff when I want to and I always enjoy it. But I think about when it’s best to say no to those things, too. And hear me out, I’m not saying it’s an easy thing to do, to decline free snacks and desserts. In fact it’s really hard. I’d even go so far as to say that it’s one of the hardest parts of maintaining a truly wholesome diet. But, when I see and feel results, when I’m able to run faster and I have really good workouts, and when my jeans don’t feel too tight because I’m bloated like a blowfish all of the time, it’s worth it. It’s totally worth it."

Knowing When to Say No

(Source: hungry-runner.com)

Every day I meet people who feel shame or are chastised by well-meaning family and friends for what they eat.

On my last birthday, a number of Facebook greetings included the comment, “Go ahead and cheat — it’s your birthday.”

I know what these well wishers meant, but this sentiment has no meaning for me. A cheater is a person who behaves dishonestly. Enjoying a piece of cake or a scoop of ice cream is not a character statement. I can eat anything I want without being a devious person.

In the interest of full disclosure, I should add that I sometimes feel like I have shortchanged myself in terms of food, but those are the days when I “chose” not to eat enough vegetables. This doesn’t make me a bad person, just not as green as I would like to be.

Every day I meet people who feel shame or are chastised by well-meaning family and friends for what they eat. This compounds the negative feelings of “cheating” on a diet. It is time for a shift in language and attitude. A first step is to change “cheat” to “choose.”

You can be a “chooser” no matter what type of food path you follow. A vegetarian seduced by stone crabs or a paleo following the scent of fresh-baked bread might choose to eat something off their usual menu. This is a choice without a value judgment. Dieters who are following strict and unrealistic guidelines might be choosing foods they normally wouldn’t because they are hungry and feel deprived.

There are tools to help you become a chooser instead of thinking of yourself as a cheater. Linda Bacon, author of Health at Every Size (BenBella Books, 2010), suggests eating in a flexible manner that values pleasure and honors internal cues of hunger, satiety and appetite. Her website supports this philosophy with concrete steps and resources to stop fighting with food.

Food is nourishment and pleasure, weight is a number, and neither defines your worth as a person.

By Sheah Rarback via Fooducate.com

It’s not even 7AM yet here in Boulder but I guarantee you this will be the best thing I read all day.

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