Hungry Runner

Gear Review: Reebok ZQuick Sneakers
I’m totally loving these for cross training right now. Click through to read more on the blog ;)

Gear Review: Reebok ZQuick Sneakers

I’m totally loving these for cross training right now. Click through to read more on the blog ;)

(Source: hungry-runner.com)

the-exercist:

How to Buy the Right Running Shoe from Runner’s World:

1) STRING IT OUTYour heel should fit snug, but not tight, says Carl Brandt. “Laced up (but not tied), you should be able to slide your feet out.” Lacing your shoes up through the final eyelet minimizes slippage. There will be some heel movement, but it shouldn’t be uncomfortable. Any irritation you feel in the store, adds Brandt, will be amplified once you hit the road.
2) THE THIRD DIMENSIONA shoe’s upper should feel snug and secure around your instep, explains Brandt. “When people tell me they feel pressure and tightness, they need more space.” If an otherwise great shoe has hot spots or pressure under the laces, try lacing it up a different way (check out Runnersworld.com/lacing for alternative lacing techniques) before moving on to the next shoe.
3) SPREAD OUT A LITTLEYour foot should be able to move side-to-side in the shoe’s forefoot without crossing over the edge of the insole, says James. You should be able to pinch a quarter inch of upper material along the widest part of your foot. If the shoe is too narrow, you’ll feel the base of your little toe sitting on the edge of the shoe last.
4) WIGGLE ROOMFeet swell and lengthen over a run, so make sure there’s a thumb’s width of space between your longest toe (which isn’t always the big toe) and the end of a shoe. A friend or shoe fitter can measure this while you stand with your shoes laced up. Your toes should also wiggle freely up and down, explains Super Jock ‘n Jill running store owner Chet James. “Wiggle room protects against front-of-the-foot issues.”
5) CHECK FOR THE BENDSCheck the flex point before you put on the shoe, suggests Carl Brandt, owner of San Diego’s Movin Shoes running stores. You can do this by holding the heel and pressing the tip of the shoe into the floor. The shoe should bend and crease along the same line your foot flexes. An improperly aligned flex point can lead to arch pain or plantar fasciitis, while a lack of flexibility leads to Achilles-tendon or calf strain.
6) STEP ON ITKnowing your arch type isn’t the whole story. You still need to pinpoint shoes that match your own arch’s contour. You can’t get a good feel by just standing, says James. So take your shoes for a quick jog, either on a store’s treadmill, on the sidewalk, or down a hallway. A natural-feeling support under the arch works for most people, adds James. “Back off the amount of support if you feel your arch cramping.”

To read more Click Here.

the-exercist:

How to Buy the Right Running Shoe from Runner’s World:

1) STRING IT OUT
Your heel should fit snug, but not tight, says Carl Brandt. “Laced up (but not tied), you should be able to slide your feet out.” Lacing your shoes up through the final eyelet minimizes slippage. There will be some heel movement, but it shouldn’t be uncomfortable. Any irritation you feel in the store, adds Brandt, will be amplified once you hit the road.

2) THE THIRD DIMENSION
A shoe’s upper should feel snug and secure around your instep, explains Brandt. “When people tell me they feel pressure and tightness, they need more space.” If an otherwise great shoe has hot spots or pressure under the laces, try lacing it up a different way (check out Runnersworld.com/lacing for alternative lacing techniques) before moving on to the next shoe.

3) SPREAD OUT A LITTLE
Your foot should be able to move side-to-side in the shoe’s forefoot without crossing over the edge of the insole, says James. You should be able to pinch a quarter inch of upper material along the widest part of your foot. If the shoe is too narrow, you’ll feel the base of your little toe sitting on the edge of the shoe last.

4) WIGGLE ROOM
Feet swell and lengthen over a run, so make sure there’s a thumb’s width of space between your longest toe (which isn’t always the big toe) and the end of a shoe. A friend or shoe fitter can measure this while you stand with your shoes laced up. Your toes should also wiggle freely up and down, explains Super Jock ‘n Jill running store owner Chet James. “Wiggle room protects against front-of-the-foot issues.”

5) CHECK FOR THE BENDS
Check the flex point before you put on the shoe, suggests Carl Brandt, owner of San Diego’s Movin Shoes running stores. You can do this by holding the heel and pressing the tip of the shoe into the floor. The shoe should bend and crease along the same line your foot flexes. An improperly aligned flex point can lead to arch pain or plantar fasciitis, while a lack of flexibility leads to Achilles-tendon or calf strain.

6) STEP ON IT
Knowing your arch type isn’t the whole story. You still need to pinpoint shoes that match your own arch’s contour. You can’t get a good feel by just standing, says James. So take your shoes for a quick jog, either on a store’s treadmill, on the sidewalk, or down a hallway. A natural-feeling support under the arch works for most people, adds James. “Back off the amount of support if you feel your arch cramping.”

To read more Click Here.

The KindRunner.com Experience
Back in May I announced my ambassadorship with KindRunner.com. I introduced you to the Kind Runner ways and then gave you the full 411 on their deal when they officially launched on June 1st. (I’m not going to take the time to explain the full gist of Kind Runner here because the two links above provide some very in depth details. So if you’re new here, click and read away!)
Their epic online running shop has been in full swing for almost two months now, but since I’m not in the market for a new pair of sneakers just yet, I haven’t had the chance to put it to The Hungry Runner Test. (But trust me, I’m DYING to order a pair of sneakers from them and you’ll learn why after reading some of the links I’m about to share.)
Continue reading…
P.S. I am not being compensated in any way at all to write about this or share it with you all. I just genuinely think that this is an awesome idea and feel like it’s something that a lot of runners might enjoy learning about!

The KindRunner.com Experience

Back in May I announced my ambassadorship with KindRunner.com. I introduced you to the Kind Runner ways and then gave you the full 411 on their deal when they officially launched on June 1st. (I’m not going to take the time to explain the full gist of Kind Runner here because the two links above provide some very in depth details. So if you’re new here, click and read away!)

Their epic online running shop has been in full swing for almost two months now, but since I’m not in the market for a new pair of sneakers just yet, I haven’t had the chance to put it to The Hungry Runner Test. (But trust me, I’m DYING to order a pair of sneakers from them and you’ll learn why after reading some of the links I’m about to share.)

Continue reading…

P.S. I am not being compensated in any way at all to write about this or share it with you all. I just genuinely think that this is an awesome idea and feel like it’s something that a lot of runners might enjoy learning about!

To enter, simply “Like” the KindRunner.com Facebook page. For every 500 fans, they’ll giveaway a new pair of running sneakers to one lucky random fan! Only 37 more to go until 1,000!

P.S. If you’re wondering what the heck KindRunner.com is, head over to hungry-runner.com to read my post explaining what they’re all about. It involves trading in your old running shoes for new ones!

To enter, simply “Like” the KindRunner.com Facebook page. For every 500 fans, they’ll giveaway a new pair of running sneakers to one lucky random fan! Only 37 more to go until 1,000!

P.S. If you’re wondering what the heck KindRunner.com is, head over to hungry-runner.com to read my post explaining what they’re all about. It involves trading in your old running shoes for new ones!

Reblog if your closet looks the same!
And check out the blog today for more details about KindRunner.com. (Which officially launched today!) Their mission is to re-purpose old running sneakers for people in need.
You buy sneaks from KindRunner.com, send your old ones back to them, get cash towards your next KindRunner purchase, and your old shoes go to someone in need. How cool?!
I’m in LOVE with this idea and am so excited to be partnering with them as a KindRunner ambassador! Are you guys with me on this? Let’s spread that big, bold kind runner LOVE!

Reblog if your closet looks the same!

And check out the blog today for more details about KindRunner.com. (Which officially launched today!) Their mission is to re-purpose old running sneakers for people in need.

You buy sneaks from KindRunner.com, send your old ones back to them, get cash towards your next KindRunner purchase, and your old shoes go to someone in need. How cool?!

I’m in LOVE with this idea and am so excited to be partnering with them as a KindRunner ambassador! Are you guys with me on this? Let’s spread that big, bold kind runner LOVE!

Check out hungry-runner.com for details and to find out how you can enter to win free running shoes for a year!

Check out hungry-runner.com for details and to find out how you can enter to win free running shoes for a year!

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The Hungry Runner by Katie is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.